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Parenting

Development

Young 
Children: What’s Up With That?

Effective discipline of young children requires knowledge about the development of children. Normal toddler behavior is often viewed as ‘misbehavior’ by parents who do not understand the physical, cognitive, social and emotional capabilities and limitations of toddlers. Research shows that children under age five comply (‘listen’) to parent requests about 40 per cent of the time. This is normal child behavior for that age, and does not require ‘teaching,’ ‘discipline’ or ‘punishment.’ This normal behavior will change as the child matures.

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Away-Camps - Letting Go Helps Kids Grow

Sleep-away camp was just what Ally needed in order to gain independence and confidence, marvels her mom, Sharon. “She found a whole new group of girls, and had a ball. She’s had a hard time with girls beginning in Grade 4,” says Sharon, “so it was great for her to bond with girls in a different setting.” Starting at age nine, Ally went away to camp for a week. The following summer, she begged to go back for four weeks. Her parents were delighted.

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Homesick, Not Helpless: Even Confident Campers Get the Blues

At 10, Ravit Pearlman is a veteran camper. She started going to overnight camp just before her seventh birthday, and she comes from what her mom, Sacha Reich, enthusiastically describes as a ‘camp family.’ Her dad, Aaron Pearlman, went to the same camp as a boy and later became a counselor there. Asked what she looks forward to at summer camp, Ravit doesn’t hesitate, “Seeing my friends again!” Her eyes sparkle as she eagerly outlines the scene: canoeing, the ropes course, bonding with the counselors, whispering to her cabin mates after dark.

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Chores by Age and Stage

Brian Pacilio was a typical teenager: Busy with sports, school, and friends. But he was not too busy to help out with dinner dishes, do some of the laundry, take out the trash, and keep his bathroom ‘hotel ready.' That’s because for Brian’s mom, Cheryl, it was about more than getting help with housework. It was about helping her son, too. Chores can be an important part of kids’ lives. Not only do tasks at home teach life skills and allow kids to contribute to the running of the household, they also yield benefits that support your child’s academic life.

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