Parenting

Development

Six Annoying Things Your Children do that are Actually Good for Them

Kids test parents’ patience all the time. They whine, bargain, cry, mope and dawdle. They yell and scream and make themselves the centre of attention. Sometimes they dig their heels in and simply refuse to budge. While we may wish our kids would be compliant, cooperative and sunny in temperament, the reality is that they are doing exactly what they’re supposed to be doing. They are learning how to manage their emotions, whether it’s sadness, anger or fear. Kids do this by expressing themselves in the moment. Unlike adults, most young children don’t hold in what they are feeling. They release pent-up emotions right when they feel them, if we let them, and then they move on!

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Calm Before the Storm - Managing a Child’s Fear of the Weather

With tornado sirens howling, thunder crashing and lightening forking through dark clouds, most anyone might feel a mixture of unease and awe with nature’s dramatic display. Many families, however, would prefer to skip the show given the emotional havoc storms wreak on their kids.

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Ask Elizabeth - “I’ll Race You!” Fun Ways to Engage Cooperation

Do you have a child who won’t cooperate with your requests? Do you repeat yourself so often that you sometimes feel invisible? Don’t get frustrated! Don’t yell, beg or threaten! Instead, try one of these fun and effective approaches.

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Help Your Preschooler Start Smart

You’ve picked up your child from their twos, threes or fours program, with the rest of the day or the weekend ahead of you. Now what? It’s a common dilemma. “So many parents ask me, ‘What do I do with my child when we get home?’” says Elissa Sungar, a former preschool teacher at Stanford University Laboratory School and the co-creator of www.ifnotyouwho.org, a free website that guides parents through 300 short and fun daily activities to help them make sure their child is ready for Kindergarten.

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